Healesville Sanctuary

Brush-tailed Rock Wallaby

The Brush-tailed Rock Wallaby inhabits rugged, rocky areas of south-east Australia. They are agile macropods that seek refuge in rocky escarpments during the day and emerge at dusk to feed on native grasses and other vegetation. Brush-tailed Rock Wallaby populations are sporadically distributed from south-eastern Queensland to eastern New South Wales and Victoria and currently are recognised as three genetically distinct populations known as Evolutionarily Significant Units (ESU).

The southern form of this species only exists in two small isolated populations in Victoria, with less than 30 animals in each. Habitat modification and impacts from feral introduced species such as cats, foxes and goats has led to the isolation of these populations over time. This in turn has lead to a lack of genetic diversity within localised populations and poses a significant threat to the ongoing survival of the species.

Saving the Brush-tailed Rock Wallaby

Zoos Victoria will be focussing our efforts on the southern ESU of the Brush-tailed Rock Wallaby found only in Victoria, increasing community awareness and investigating our role in supporting a captive population. 

Plans and publications

DSE National Recovery Plan for the Brush-tailed Rock-wallaby Petrogale penicillata

Meet the animals

Brush-tailed Rock Wallaby

The Shadow Warrior for Extinction Fighters

Found: amongst rocky outcrops and cliffs

She is graceful and elusive.

Meet all 20 priority native threatened species

Zoos Victoria plans to save this endangered animal.

See all of our 20 priority threatened native species.

News
Love Your Locals tram launch image 1

Victoria's most endangered take to the streets

A City Circle tram has been dressed up to feature Zoos Victoria’s 20 priority native threatened species.

24 October 2012
Did you know?
  • The Brush-tailed Rock Wallaby can bound great distances, up and across rocky terrain
  • Feral goats are known to displace Brush-tailed Rock Wallabies from their daytime refuges
  • In Victoria, the southern form of the Brush-tailed Rock Wallaby is now limited to two small populations isolated from each other