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12 May 2014

A major move has taken place at Melbourne Zoo today, with a 60 year-old Moreton Bay Fig transplanted to become the centre-piece of the Zoo’s  soon-to-be-constructed Predator’s Precinct.

In an Australian first, the enormous 120-tonne Moreton Bay Fig was moved just under 80 metres using new inflatable cushion technology. The move signals the beginning of the construction phase for the new $5.8 million Predator’s Precinct development, which will be home to two of Africa’s iconic predator species: lions and wild dogs,  and the world’s most endangered crocodile, the Philippines Crocodile.

The State Government has contributed $5 million towards the new development, with the Zoo currently fundraising for the remaining $800,000 for a Learning Centre in the heart of the new precinct.

Through the construction of new exhibits such as Predators’ Precinct as well as general operations, and tourism, an independent Ernst and Young analysis found that Melbourne Zoo contributes more than $311.9 million a year to the state’s economy each year and supports more than 1,700 jobs.

The new Predator’s Precinct will replace the iconic Lion Park and provide an exciting new experience for visitors as well as improving animal welfare and safety at the zoo.

You can help support the building of the new Predator’s Precinct Learning Centre by donating today. Every dollar you donate will be matched dollar-for-dollar through the generous support of The Yulgilbar Foundation.* 

Zoos Victoria would like to thank The Yulgilbar Foundation and the Sid and Fiona Myer Family Trust and The Ian Potter Foundation for supporting the Predator’s Precinct Learning Centre.

*For every dollar you donate, the Yulgilbar Foundation will match it up to a total value of $400,000.

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