Wombat wars for little Scarlett

6 June 2014

It’s been a tough start for little Scarlett. Found in her dead mother’s pouch by a passing motorist, she has been handraised by a wildlife carer and now, at 15 months old, she was ready to be introduced to other wombats for socialisation, a normal procedure ahead of release back to the wild.

Unfortunately she sustained some minor wounds during a fight with one of her new ‘friends’ when she visited the communal burrow. In an animal with a healthy immune system, these wounds would have healed quickly but, in Scarlett’s case, they became infected and formed abscesses.           

After a full check up at Healesville Sanctuary’s Australian Wildlife Health Centre, the vets discovered that Scarlett’s immature immune system was very slow to respond, and this was why the infection was able to take hold.

Our vets and nurses have provided ongoing care to support her immune system, helping her battle infection and build her strength, and the great news is that Scarlett is slowly improving. She is receiving regular health and blood checks to monitor her immune systems response. Vets are unclear when she may be released back to the wild.

Most animals like Scarlett are successfully treated but many need months of rehabilitation before they can be released back into the wild. And it’s this ongoing care that can be extremely costly. This winter Healesville Sanctuary needs to raise $150,000 to sustain our wildlife hospital over the next three months, so animals like Scarlett get the veterinary attention they deserve.

You can support the vet team who treat our precious wildlife like Scarlett by simply making a tax deductible donation.